Defending the Judeo-Christian Heritage, limited government, and the American Constitution
Thursday August 27th 2015

lincoln family bible study
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S.E.M., Vol. 1, No. 7
Federalist 69 - by Alexander Hamilton. 1. What are the chief characters in regards to the President as outlined in the proposed Constitution? 2. Why does Hamilton believe the term of office for a President should be longer than three years? 3. What was the term of office for the king of England and what, in your opinion, is the potential for abuse in such a term? Would the term of office of the king of England present any advantages - in the Founders experience and in your opinion - over over the new American system? Read all of the questions and post your response at our new resource Self-Educated Man

Weapons For Civic Debauchery

Prophet Statesmen, J. Reuben Clark Jr.

The care of the indigent poor and the aged, of the sick and maimed, except those injured in wars, of the unemployed, was left to the States.

Where the franchise is universal, the opportunity for its corruption must be limited to the smallest possible political unit, if free government is to live.

A weak fancy may picture how those shrewd, experienced, politically minded patriots of the Constitutional Convention would have viewed a proposal that the Federal Government should take over the sheltering, feeding, and clothing of great groups of its voting citizenry, without cost to those getting the help. The occasional old Roman Triumph with its feasts and gifts, with its military reviews and gladiatorial games, was, compared with this, a puny weapon for civic debauchery and yet those Triumphs helped to pull down Rome in ruin.

Source: J. Reuben Clark Jr., February 22, 1935. J. Reuben Clark Jr. (1871–1961), served as a mem­ber of the First Pres­i­dency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1931–1961. Prior to his full-time church ser­vice he was assis­tant solic­i­tor to the State Depart­ment, worked in the Attor­ney General’s office, Under Sec­re­tary of State, the author of the clas­sic study, the “Clark Mem­o­ran­dum on the Mon­roe Doc­trine” and U.S. ambas­sador to Mex­ico. Among those who knew his work best, J. Reuben Clark was rec­og­nized as the fore­most con­sti­tu­tional scholar of the 20th Century.