Defending the Judeo-Christian Heritage, limited government, and the American Constitution
Saturday July 25th 2015

lincoln family bible study
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S.E.M., Vol. 1, No. 7
Federalist 69 - by Alexander Hamilton. 1. What are the chief characters in regards to the President as outlined in the proposed Constitution? 2. Why does Hamilton believe the term of office for a President should be longer than three years? 3. What was the term of office for the king of England and what, in your opinion, is the potential for abuse in such a term? Would the term of office of the king of England present any advantages - in the Founders experience and in your opinion - over over the new American system? Read all of the questions and post your response at our new resource Self-Educated Man

Benjamin Franklin on Self-Denial

Daily Dabble in the Classics, Benjamin Franklin

… for self denial is never a duty or a reasonable action but as it is a natural means of procuring more pleasure than you can taste without it; so that this grave, saint-like guide to happiness, as rough and dreadful as she has been made to appear, is in truth the kindest and most beautiful mistress in the world … It is doing all the good we can to others, by acts of humanity, friendship, generosity, and benevolence; this is that constant and durable good which will afford contentment and satisfaction always alike, without variation or diminution … their happiness or chief good consist in acting up to their chief faculty, or that faculty which distinguishes them form all creatures of a different species. The chief faculty in man is his reason, and consequently his chief good, or that which may be justly called his good, consists not merely in action, but in reasonable action. By reasonable actions we understand those actions which are preservative of the human kind and naturally tend to produce real and unmixed happiness.

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Source: Benjamin Franklin: “Dialogue Concerning Virtue and Pleasure,” and “A Second Dialogue Between Philocles and Horatio Concerning Virtue and Pleasure,” from “The Works of Benjamin Franklin,” edited by John Bigelow, Vol. I, pp. 387, 393-95.

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Daily Dabble in the Classics is a project of Steve Farrell and The Moral Liberal. Copyright © 2011 Steve Farrell.