Defending the Judeo-Christian Ethic, Limited Government, & the American Constitution
Wednesday October 1st 2014

Self-Educated Man


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Federalist 58 by James Madison. 1. Under the proposed Constitution whose interests were represented by the U.S. Senate? Is it so today? If not, how might it be remedied & by what means? 2. How did the Constitution provide for updating representation in Congress? 3. Madison credits the U.S Constitution with assigning the greatest power, that of the “purse strings” to the U.S. House. In your opinion, how might the House assert that power to reduce the size & cost of government today? 4. Explain in your own words Madison’s warning against too many men serving in the House. How might his warning be applied today as calls abound for a more direct democracy & for scrapping the electoral college system? 5. Is democracy the form of government our Founders gave us or was it a republican form? Explain the difference.


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Standing Fast by the Constitution

Called Unto Liberty, 20th Century Sermons, J. Reuben Clark Jr.

No necessity has thus far arisen in our history which could not have been ultimately and adequately met by constitutional methods . . . . There is every reason to believe that those who understand the spirit as well as the word of the Constitution will be able in the future as in the past to find a way under it to meet all national emergencies and yet preserve its great principles and the republican form of government for which it provides.


Return to “Called Unto Liberty” Home Page.


Source: J. Reuben Clark Jr., 1965, Stand Fast by Our Constitution, p. 158. J. Reuben Clark Jr. (1871–1961), served as a mem­ber of the First Pres­i­dency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1931–1961. Prior to his full-time church ser­vice he served as assis­tant solic­i­tor to the State Depart­ment, served in the Attor­ney General’s office, served as Under Sec­re­tary of State, was the author of the clas­sic study the “Clark Mem­o­ran­dum on the Mon­roe Doc­trine,” and served as U.S. Ambas­sador to Mex­ico. Among those who knew his work best, J. Reuben Clark was rec­og­nized as the fore­most con­sti­tu­tional scholar of the 20th Century.


Called Unto Liberty is a project of Steve Farrell and The Moral Liberal.


The Moral Liberal recommends J. Reuben Clark Jr’s: Stand Fast by Our Constitution