Defending the Judeo-Christian Ethic, Limited Government, & the American Constitution
Friday July 25th 2014

Self-Educated Man

lincoln family bible study


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Federalist 58 by James Madison. 1. Under the proposed Constitution whose interests were represented by the U.S. Senate? Is it so today? If not, how might it be remedied & by what means? 2. How did the Constitution provide for updating representation in Congress? 3. Madison credits the U.S Constitution with assigning the greatest power, that of the “purse strings” to the U.S. House. In your opinion, how might the House assert that power to reduce the size & cost of government today? 4. Explain in your own words Madison’s warning against too many men serving in the House. How might his warning be applied today as calls abound for a more direct democracy & for scrapping the electoral college system? 5. Is democracy the form of government our Founders gave us or was it a republican form? Explain the difference.


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June at Supreme Court: ObamaCare & Immigration

JAY SEKULOW, ACLJ

No one knows exactly when the Supreme Court will issue its decisions in the ObamaCare and Arizona immigration cases. No one except the Justices and those who work for them.

In a world where leaks abound, the Supreme Court is one of the very few institutions in America where leaks are very rare and simply not tolerated.

Don’t expect anything different this time around. You won’t hear a word from the Court on these two blockbuster issues – that is – until the Justices take the bench and proclaim their decisions.

But the clock is ticking and June marks the final month of this term. Pundits and scholars are trying to read the tea leaves. The process of elimination – which cases already have been decided and which have not – will generate intense speculation as the month unfolds.

As we have been telling your for months, there’s a lot at stake with these issues. As you know, the pro-abortion, government-run ObamaCare health law includes an individual mandate that forces Americans, under penalty of law, to purchase health insurance. The Justices took three days to hear oral arguments on numerous legal challenges, including the constitutionality of the mandate itself. We filed multiple amicus briefs with the high court challenging ObamaCare, including a brief arguing that the mandate is unconstitutional. In that brief, we represent 119 members of Congress and nearly 145,000 Americans urging the Justices to reject the individual mandate.

We’ve also challenged directly the individual mandate aspect of ObamaCare in our case that is on appeal before the Supreme Court.

And, in the immigration case, we represent 57 members of Congress and more than 65,000 Americans in an amicus brief filed with the high court in support of the Arizona law. Oral arguments in this case at the end of April left the impression that several Justices seemed to think Arizona took appropriate action to protect its citizens and border, especially since the federal government has failed to do so.

When the Supreme Court does announce its decisions in ObamaCare and the Arizona immigration case, we will have the latest news and our reaction and analysis. It will be posted to the website, to Facebook, Twitter, and of course, discussed in-depth on our daily radio broadcasts.

June will be a very historic and busy month for the high court – decisions that will set the course in this country on health care and immigration policy for years to come. Stay tuned.


Jay Sekulow is Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), one of the most prestigious law firms in the country. He is an accomplished Supreme Court advocate, renowned expert on religious liberty, and a respected broadcaster. Jay Sekulow is an attorney with a passion for protecting religious liberty – freedom – democracy.


Used with the permission of the American Center for Law and Justice.