Defending the Judeo-Christian Ethic, Limited Government, & the American Constitution
Wednesday July 30th 2014

Self-Educated Man

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Federalist 58 by James Madison. 1. Under the proposed Constitution whose interests were represented by the U.S. Senate? Is it so today? If not, how might it be remedied & by what means? 2. How did the Constitution provide for updating representation in Congress? 3. Madison credits the U.S Constitution with assigning the greatest power, that of the “purse strings” to the U.S. House. In your opinion, how might the House assert that power to reduce the size & cost of government today? 4. Explain in your own words Madison’s warning against too many men serving in the House. How might his warning be applied today as calls abound for a more direct democracy & for scrapping the electoral college system? 5. Is democracy the form of government our Founders gave us or was it a republican form? Explain the difference.


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Advice from Charles Murray

BY PHYLLIS SCHLAFLY

Charles Murray is the author of some important books about the state of our American society and the consequences of our overspending taxpayers’ money on the welfare state. His latest book is called “Coming Apart: 1960 to 2010.” An excerpt from his book was printed in the Wall Street Journal that I want to share with you because I think it is so important. Here is the extensive quotation from Charles Murray:

“The prerequisite for any eventual policy solution consists of a simple cultural change: It must once again be taken for granted that a male in the prime of life who isn’t even looking for work is behaving badly. There can be exceptions for those who are genuinely unable to work or are house husbands. But reasonably healthy working-age males who aren’t working or even looking for work, who live off their girlfriends, families or the state, must once again be openly regarded by their fellow citizens as lazy, irresponsible and unmanly. Whatever their social class, they are, for want of a better word, bums. To bring about this cultural change, we must change the language that we use. … Call them whatever derogatory word you prefer. Equally important: Start treating the men who aren’t feckless with respect. Recognize that the guy who works on your lawn every week is morally superior in this regard to your neighbor’s college-educated son who won’t take a [so-called] “demeaning” job. Be willing to say so.

This shouldn’t be such a hard thing to do. Most of us already believe that one of life’s central moral obligations is to be a productive adult. The cultural shift I advocate doesn’t demand that we change our minds about anything; we just need to drop our non-judgmentalism. … We should stop making excuses for them that we wouldn’t make for ourselves. Respect those who deserve respect, but look down on those who deserve looking down on.

Those are all quotes from Charles Murray.

I’d like to hear comments from my listeners about his suggestions.


Contributing Editor, Phyllis Schlafly, is the Founder and President of Eagle Forum, a national radio show host, and a best-selling author.


Used with the permission of Eagle Forum.


The Moral Liberal recommends: Phyllis Schlafly and Grassroots Conservatism: A Woman’s Crusade (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America)


Comments from the Moral Liberal on the above. We don’t endorse the approach. Reasserting the Judeo-Christian work ethic, pointing out its benefits, its historical and current success stories, the pitfalls of not living up to it individually and collectively, and coupling such things with a call for the elimination of state programs that promote dependency, even institutionalize it, are much better methods in our opinion than personal insults which fail to build up anyone or anything but only contribute to the class warfare that the revolutionaries of the left have been working on inspiring for decades. We also feel that we all individually need to examine our own lives and see whether or not we ourselves are on one form of government dole or another. It will be hard to inspire such a change in anyone that we ourselves aren’t committed to embrace as well.