Defending the Judeo-Christian Ethic, Limited Government, & the American Constitution
Friday October 24th 2014

Self-Educated Man


lincoln family bible study



Read along with us; share your insights, ask questions, post a link that adds to the discussion


October 06, 2014


Federalist 62. Madison reminds us that the election of U.S. Senators by their respective state legislatures secured state rights or authority. In your opinion, how might a return to this vital constitutional principle become a key element in empowering a push back against federal intrusion into powers our heaven inspired Constitution clearly retained as jurisdictionally belonging to state & local governments, to families & individuals, to private businesses, churches, & charities?


Special Series



Missing the Mark with Religion, by Steve Farrell (click here)


Democrats In Drag, by Steve Farrell (click here)


Rebels They Were Not! by Steve Farrell (click here)


Vander Elst Essays by Philip Vander Elst


A Philosophy of Truth and Liberty, by Ricky Valadez

  1. To Those With a Conscience

2. The Science of Liberty

 


THE PULPIT & THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: Leonard O. Goenaga

1.  Major Themes

2.  Jonathan Mayhew

3.  Samuel Cooper

4.  Jonas Clark

5.  Charles Chauncy

6.  Isaac Backus

7.  John Leland


JUST WAR, REBELLION, & THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: Leonard O. Goenaga

Introduction

Scripture and Rebellion: Introduction

Scripture on Government

Scripture on the Common Good

Scripture on Liberty

Scripture on Unchecked Power

Scripture on the Rule of Law

Scripture on Consent

 

CHURCH TRADITION & REBELLION: BACKGROUND, by Leonard O. Goenaga

 

Church Tradition and Rebellion: Introduction 

Tradition on Pre-reformation practices

Tradition on Reformation Practices

Tradition on Post Reformation Practices

Tradition on Romans 13 and the Paradox of Rebellion

The English Experience and the Peace of Westphalia

The Glorious Revolution and British/American Parallels

The Petition of Right (1627) and the Bill of Rights (1688)

The Mayflower Compact (1620) and the Colonists

The American Experience Culminating with the American Revolution

The Initial Colonial Response (1764-1767) – The Sugar Act (1764), The Stamp Act (1765), The Stamp Act Congress (1765), Declaration of Rights and Grievances (1765), The Virginia Resolves (1765), The Declaratory Act (1766), and The Townshend Acts (1767)

The First Continental Response (1773-1774) – The Tea Act (1773), The Intolerable Acts (1774), and The First Continental Congress (1774)

The Reason for Alarm (1774-1775) – The Powder Alarm (1774), The Portsmouth Alarm (1774), and The Salem Confrontation (1775

The Second Continental Response (1774-1775) – Lexington and Concord (1775), Second Continental Congress (1775), and The Olive Branch Petition (1775)

The Royal Response (1775) – A Proclamation By the King for Suppressing Rebellion and Sedition (1775)

Just Rebellion Principles (JRP) and the American Revolution

Just Rebellion Principle 1: Just Cause

Just Rebellion Principle 2: Proportionate Cause

Just Rebellion Principle 3: Right Intention

Just Rebellion Principle 4: Competent Authority

Just Rebellion Principle 5: Probability of Success

Just Rebellion Principle 6: Comparative Justice

Just Rebellion Principle 7: Last Resort

Summation: In Light of the Evidence

Conclusion