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Monday February 8th 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Aristotle’

On Moral Philosophy

On Moral Philosophy

by Mortimer J. Adler, Ph.D. Philosophy, seeking to establish itself as knowledge rather than mere speculation and unfounded opinion, is afflicted with a series of errors that have occurred in modern times. These must be corrected in order for philosophy to succeed in its effort to provide us with ethical and political knowledge. In my [...]

Aristotle’s Ethics: The Theory of Happiness – II

Aristotle’s Ethics: The Theory of Happiness – II

BY MORTIMER J. ADLER The main point we have seen so far is that, for Aristotle, a happy life is a good life. In other words, happiness is good. But other things are good, too -- such things as health and wealth, knowledge and friendship, and a good moral character. We recognize all these things as good. All of us want them, and would regret [...]

Aristotle’s Ethics: The Theory of Happiness – I

Aristotle’s Ethics: The Theory of Happiness – I

BY MORTIMER J. ADLER The Humanities represent man's concern with man and with the human world. In that concern there is no more important problem than the age-old one which was first discussed systematically here, in Greece, more than two thousand years ago. The problem I refer to, which the ancient Greek philosophers thought deeply [...]

General Metaphysics of Thomas Aquinas

General Metaphysics of Thomas Aquinas

THE PHILOSOPHY OF THOMAS AQUINAS MADE SIMPLE, BY JONATHAN DOLHENTY, PH.D. Part V, General Metaphysics Aquinas accepts the general principles of the metaphysics of Aristotle, for whom there are two principles of being, potency and act. Act signifies being, reality, perfection; potency is non-being, non-reality, [...]

Theory of Knowledge (Epistemology) of Thomas Aquinas

Theory of Knowledge (Epistemology) of Thomas Aquinas

The Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas Made Simple, by Jonathan Dolhenty, Ph.D. Part IV, Epistemology of Thomas Aquinas To explain the process of knowledge, Thomas Aquinas has recourse neither to the innate ideas of Platonism nor to the illumination of Augustine. Instead, he postulates a cognitive faculty naturally capable of acquiring [...]

The Bodyguards of Truth – Mortimer J. Adler

The Bodyguards of Truth – Mortimer J. Adler

BY MORTIMER J. ADLER, PH.D. My serious study of philosophy began when, at Columbia University in the early twenties, I took a course in the history of philosophy taught by Professor F.J.E. Woodbridge. Just before Christmas in 1921, I received as a Christmas gift, a copy of the Oxford translation of Aristotle's Metaphysics, with an inscription [...]

Why “Equality” Must Die – Selwyn Duke

Why “Equality” Must Die – Selwyn Duke

BY SELWYN DUKE Take a look at the following list and tell me if anything strikes you: Prudence Justice Temperance Courage Faith Hope Charity Viewing these, the Seven Cardinal Virtues, anything make an impression? Okay, now try the Seven Heavenly Virtues [...]

The Misfortunes of Philosophy in Antiquity

The Misfortunes of Philosophy in Antiquity

BY MORTIMER J. ADLER, PH.D. With the speculations of the pre-Socratic philosophers, with the dialogues of Plato, and with the treatises of Aristotle, philosophy got off to a good start in three respects. (1) The Greek philosophers managed to pose, and to pose quite clearly, many of the fundamental questions of philosophy. The fecundity of [...]

Jesus Taught the Solution to Bullying

Jesus Taught the Solution to Bullying

Even most Christians don't realize they have already been given the solution. By Izzy Kalman I am writing this on December 24. Tonight almost a third of the world’s population will celebrate Christmas, the holiday that commemorates the birth of Jesus. Christmas has become a gift-giving holiday. This article is my gift to the Christians of [...]

Wisdom: The Free, Eternal Solution to Bullying

Wisdom: The Free, Eternal Solution to Bullying

Horrific suicides continue because we are not teaching children wisdom. BY IZZY KALMAN Hardly a week goes by before we learn of another tragic case of a child committing suicide because he/she couldn’t tolerate being bullied. And the public’s response is always the same: we need to pass tougher anti-bullying laws. Haven’t we noticed [...]

Little Errors in the Beginning

Little Errors in the Beginning

MORTIMER J. ADLER, PH.D. I. In his introduction to De Ente et Essentia St. Thomas Aquinas remarks that “a little error in the beginning leads to a great one in the end.” He is here rephrasing an observation made by Aristotle in De Caelo, I, 5: “The least initial deviation from the truth is multiplied later a [...]

Aristotle and a Synoptic Philosophy—Dolhenty

Aristotle and a Synoptic Philosophy—Dolhenty

By Jonathan Dolhenty, Ph.D. The word "synoptic" comes to us from the Greek "sunoprikos," which means "seeing the whole together" or "taking a comprehensive view." It is an attempt to achieve an all-inclusive overview of one's subject matter and to see all its parts in relationship to one another. Synoptic philosophy sets out to see [...]

Aristotle and a Synoptic Philosophy

Aristotle and a Synoptic Philosophy

By Jonathan Dolhenty, Ph.D. The word "synoptic" comes to us from the Greek "sunoprikos," which means "seeing the whole together" or "taking a comprehensive view." It is an attempt to achieve an all-inclusive overview of one's subject matter and to see all its parts in relationship to one another. Synoptic philosophy sets out to see [...]

The Principal Causes Of Revolution In Democracies

The Principal Causes Of Revolution In Democracies

The Moral Liberal, Classics Library Aristotle: “Politics”, Book Five, Part 5, 350 B.C.E. And now, taking each constitution separately, we must see what follows from the principles already laid down. Revolutions in democracies are generally caused by the intemperance of demagogues, who either in their private capacity lay information [...]

Of The Judiciary And Courts Of Law

Of The Judiciary And Courts Of Law

The Moral Liberal, Classics Library Aristotle: “Politics”, Book Four, Part 16, 350 B.C.E. Of the three parts of government, the judicial remains to be considered, and this we shall divide on the same principle. There are three points on which the variedes of law-courts depend: The persons from whom they are appointed, the matters with which [...]

On The Three Types Of Tyranny

On The Three Types Of Tyranny

The Moral Liberal, Classics Library Aristotle: “Politics”, Book Four, Part 10, 350 B.C.E. Of the nature of tyranny I have still to speak, in order that it may have its place in our inquiry (since even tyranny is reckoned by us to be a form of government), although there is not much to be said about it. I have already in the former part of [...]

Regarding Polity Or Constitutional Government

Regarding Polity Or Constitutional Government

The Moral Liberal, Classics Library Aristotle: “Politics”, Book Four, Part 9, 350 B.C.E. Next we have to consider how by the side of oligarchy and democracy the so-called polity or constitutional government springs up, and how it should be organized. The nature of it will be at once understood from a comparison of oligarchy and democracy; we [...]

Of Polity Or Constitutional Government

Of Polity Or Constitutional Government

The Moral Liberal, Classics Library Aristotle: “Politics”, Book Four, Part 7, 350 B.C.E. There are still two forms besides democracy and oligarchy; one of them is universally recognized and included among the four principal forms of government, which are said to be (1) monarchy, (2) oligarchy, (3) democracy, and (4) the so-called aristocracy [...]

Aristotle: Power in the State

Aristotle: Power in the State

The Moral Liberal, Classics Library  Aristotle: “Politics”, Book Four, Part 4, 350 B.C.E. It must not be assumed, as some are fond of saying, that democracy is simply that form of government in which the greater number are sovereign, for in oligarchies, and indeed in every government, the majority rules; nor again is oligarchy that [...]

The Supreme Power in the State: Aristotle’s Politics, Bk 4, Prt 2

The Supreme Power in the State: Aristotle’s Politics, Bk 4, Prt 2

The Moral Liberal, Classics Library  Aristotle: “Politics”, Book Four, Part 2, 350 B.C.E. In our original discussion about governments we divided them into three true forms: kingly rule, aristocracy, and constitutional government, and three corresponding perversions- tyranny, oligarchy, and democracy. Of kingly rule and of aristocracy, [...]

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